Competition

Seasonal Ingredients of Northern and Southern Europe

 

Working with the rhythm of the seasons can be a powerful thing.

Download Autumn PDF

Download Winter PDF

Download Spring PDF

Download Summer PDF

Go with the Flow – Northern Europe

When Ryan Chetiyawardana took the decision at White Lyan in Hoxton to ban all citrus fruits from the menu, it was part of a requirement for no perishables to be stored on site. Many of his cocktails would be pre-made.

However, it is also a major seasonal statement. You don’t find many lemon trees in London, while soft fruit is only grown locally for a few months every year. And the limitations seem to be working, as a second bar from Ryan opens on the South Bank. “Too much choice is difficult and can blind people,” he insists.

As songwriters have produced great music from the strictures of the chorus and verse form, so the limitations of what produce is available, month by month, can inspire creativity. Not being able to use soft fruit in winter could lead you to mix with root vegetables – as some bartenders are increasingly doing.

So, investigating what’s actually seasonally available can mark out a route towards other destinations. For example the lesser-known herb ‘winter savory’ that’s around in the colder months can add peppery hints to your drink, a flavour that’s commonly used in food rather than cocktails.

That’s why we’ve produced this guide with seasonality in mind. It’s aimed at bartenders rather than chefs, which means we’ve focused on soft fruit, herbs and a few vegetables for the more adventurous. The charts are designed for the north of Europe too, a subarctic/continental climate where cobnuts and elderflowers proliferate rather than peaches and melons.

We hope you find these charts useful – and also that you get that indescribable feeling of satisfaction that can only come from working in harmony with nature.

 

Download Autumn PDF

Download Winter PDF

Download Spring PDF

Download Summer PDF

Go with the Flow – Southern Europe

One of the great Italian cocktails is seasonal at heart. The Bellini was created by Giuseppe Cipriani in the 1930s using fresh white peaches not far from his bar in Venice.

Now they are shipped all over the world year-round, but the tradition of marinating fresh, local peaches in wine is what marks out the best versions. That’s why top bartenders, such as Diageo World Class winner Mattia Pastori, based in Milan, want to look back to go forward.

“I take classics and try to do something new with them,’ Mattia explains, ‘It could be something quite retro from the 1960s or 1980s that I then reinvent using something seasonal like pears or white peach.”

As songwriters have produced great music from the strictures of the chorus and verse form, so the limitations of what produce is available, month by month, can inspire creativity. In other words, investigating what’s actually seasonally available can mark out a route towards new creations. For example the lesser-known herb ‘winter savory’ that’s around in the colder months can add peppery hints to your drink, a flavour that’s commonly used in food rather than cocktails.

That’s why we’ve produced this fabulous seasonal guide. It’s aimed at bartenders rather than chefs, which means we’ve focused on soft fruit, herbs and a few vegetables for the more adventurous. It’s designed for your region too – southern Europe – because the Mediterranean and continental climate makes for a particular array of delicious produce.

We hope you find these charts useful – and also that you get that indescribable feeling of satisfaction that can only come from working in harmony with nature.